Paul Olk

Paul Olk

Senior Associate Dean and Professor of Management, Daniels College of Business

Paul Olk is Senior Associate Dean for Faculty, Research and Accreditation and the Chief Knowledge Officer at Daniels College of Business of the University of Denver, as well as a Professor of Management. His research primarily examines the interaction of individual and organizational factors in the formation and management of strategic alliances. He is currently engaged in a three-year National Science Foundation-funded research project that investigates open-source collaboration in the pharmaceutical industry. His work has appeared in numerous books and journals including Strategic Management Journal, Organization Science, Academy of Management Learning and Education, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. He currently is also the President of the Western Academy of Management (2016-2017) and has also served the profession as the Chair of the Academy of Management’s Technology and Innovation Management Division (2011-2012), as the co-founder and co-organizer of the Sustainability, Ethics and Entrepreneurship (SEE) conferences (2012-2015), and has held committee member positions for other professional associations. Paul received his Ph.D. and M.A. from The Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and a B.S. with Honors from the University of Wisconsin. Previously he was on the faculty of the University of California, Irvine and has been a visiting professor at National University of Singapore, at IMD in Lausanne Switzerland, and a guest professor at South China University of Technology in Guangzhou, China.

Health & Aging | Friday, September 16, 2016

The average U.S. citizen spends over $1,000 a year on prescription medications, 36% higher than the next country. Why do prescription medicines cost so much? Why can some pharmaceutical companies dramatically raise the price of a drug seemingly overnight? In this session, we will explore the drug development process and the critical role of patents and intellectual property (IP) rights. We will then discuss recent changes affecting the industry, and highlight findings from National Science Foundation-funded research into the emergence of “open source” collaborations, where pharmaceutical firms collaborate and give away their IP for free. We will conclude with the implications these collaborations have for the future of drug development.