David Patterson

David Patterson

Professor of Biological Sciences, Member, Knoebel Institute for Healthy Aging

Dr. Patterson received his B.S. from MIT and his Ph.D. from Brandeis University. He is currently a Professor of Biological Sciences, a Senior Scientist of the Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, a member of the Knoebel Institute for Healthy Aging, and holds the Theodore Puck Endowed Chair at DU. His research focuses on genetic, biochemical, and metabolic changes associated with aging and with Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability in the human population and a premature aging syndrome, and other human health conditions. He uses cell and animal models for these studies. He has published over 200 peer reviewed scientific articles and contributed to seminal work on Alzheimer’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), Down syndrome, the sequencing of human chromosome 21, and cancer. His work has been supported by the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development as well as by several foundations. He serves on the National Institute on Aging Neuroscience of Aging Review Committee, the Medical Scientific Committee of the Colorado Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association, the National Down Syndrome Society Science and Clinical Advisory Board, the Science Advisory Board of the Jerome Lejeune Foundation USA, and is a member of the Down Syndrome Medical Interest Group.

Health & Aging | Friday, September 16, 2016

The most significant risk factor for many disorders including certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disease (Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) is aging. Aging itself eventually negatively impacts quality of life due, for example, to increasing frailty and cognitive decline. Therefore, understanding the biology of aging may lead to ways to delay or decrease susceptibility to all of these conditions and improve healthy aging. We will discuss the use of cell and animal models to study the biology of aging to obtain new understanding that could lead to interventions to extend longevity and healthspan.